Small biases, large consequences: an interactive online game on diversity or segregation

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Often it takes dramatic illustration to convey just why certain abstract concepts are so important to thinking critically about knowledge. For demonstrating the significance of concepts of “bias” and “implications”, try this online game with your students. “The Parable of the Polygons” provides an attractive, interactive – and startling! – visualization of what can follow from accepting some initial ideas, […]

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All eyes on Rio!

As the eyes of the world turn to Rio de Janeiro, the Olympics and Paralympics provide a fantastic opportunity for holiday clubs around the globe to engage in some lively themed activities… Opening ceremony Why not have your own opening ceremony?  Children could dress up and role-play a section of this year’s actual ceremony (you could […]

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Getting it wrong, getting it right, and generating knowledge questions: “The Forgotten History of Autism”.

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Rarely does a 14-minute talk hit so many ideas we explore in Theory of Knowledge or treat them so engagingly. In his 2015 TED talk “The forgotten history of autism”, Steve Silberman hands us a splendid case study of failures and successes in the pursuit of knowledge, and the features that distinguished them. He treats central concepts such as classification (of conditions, […]

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Supporting School Improvement through Lesson Study

Di spoke on developing great teaching through Lesson Study at Oxford University Press’ Developing Great Teaching Conference in London on 23rd June, hosted in collaboration with the Teacher Development Trust, NAHT and NAHT Edge. Here she follows up her seminar. You’ll find a selection of resources and videos from the day on our website. ‘A systematic and integrated approach to staff development, that focuses on the professional learning of […]

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