Is knowing harder than dieting?

Theory of Knowledge banner

Oh no! More suggestion, in an article I’m reading, that gaining reliable knowledge from the media might be even harder than sticking to a diet! Just as we’re assaulted with tempting displays of candy and chocolate as we head for the supermarket check-out, we’re faced with screaming headlines, awful photos, and our own fear and excitement […]

Read more

Red lines and “complex moral duality”: TOK and ethics of witnessing

Theory of Knowledge banner

“Civilians Attacked by Chemical Weapons!” Few headlines spark as much outrage. If a TOK class engages students in the questions of knowledge connected with this kind of horrendous event, it can help them feel the importance of the intellectual tools that the course provides for probing into – and reacting to – such events. A reflective piece in the current edition […]

Read more

Reliability in psychological science: methodology in crisis?

Theory of Knowledge banner

“Scientific truth is a moving target,” wrote the editors of the Public Library of Science (PLoS) a decade ago. “But is it inevitable, as John Ioannidis argues …that the majority of findings are actually false?” In the decade since the editors posed this question, the psychological sciences have been shaken by further challenges to their credibility, including some widely reported controversies. It was August of this […]

Read more

Mathematics and Scientific Methodology: example Malaria

Theory of Knowledge banner

(Originally posted on Activating TOK)  The statistics are horrifying.  Every minute, a child dies from malaria. In 2013, 90% of the world’s malaria deaths occurred in Africa and over 430,000 African children died before their fifth birthdays. And there are plenty more statistics  where these came from : In 2013, there were about 198 million malaria cases (with an uncertainty […]

Read more

Germany’s Pegida: “groping in the dark of logic”

Theory of Knowledge banner

(Re-posted from Activating TOK ) “As a default, we humans are notoriously irrational,” writes Adam Fletcher . “Many of us suffer from something called dysrationalia which is being unable to think and behave rationally despite having adequate intelligence. Dysrationalia explains why otherwise smart people might believe in horoscopes, Yeti, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy, or Xenu, the ruler of the […]

Read more