Primary School Accountability in 2016

James Clements 2

Today the DfE published a document called Primary school accountability in 2016.

Although it is mainly concerned with the technical aspects of how the accountability measures for 2016 will be calculated, it gives a handy overview for schools about what will be reported in 2016. This includes how progress measures will be calculated, which is very different to the current ‘expected progress’ measure, based on pupils making at least 2 levels of progress between key stage 1 and key stage 2. Some key reminders from the document are:

2016 performance tables

The performance tables for 2016 will show:

  1. The percentage of pupils achieving the ‘expected standard’ in English reading, English writing and mathematics at the end of key stage 2

The DfE say:

‘The percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard is a combined measure across the three subjects. To be counted towards the measure, a pupil must have a scaled score of 100 or more in reading and a scaled score of 100 or more in mathematics; and have been teacher assessed in writing as ‘working at the expected standard’ or ‘working at greater depth in the expected standard’.’

  1. An average scaled score for the pupils who sat the KS2 tests for English reading and mathematics at the end of key stage 2
  2. The percentage of pupils who achieve at ‘high standard’ in English reading, English writing and mathematics.

The DfE say:

‘The percentage of pupils achieving at a higher standard is also a combined measure across the three subjects. To be counted towards the measure, a pupil must have a high scaled score in reading and a high scaled score in mathematics; and have been teacher assessed in writing as ‘working at a greater depth’. We will confirm what constitutes achieving a high scaled score in mathematics and English reading, after the new key stage 2 tests have been sat in summer 2016.’

  1. Pupils’ average progress in English reading, English writing and mathematics.

The DfE say:

‘The system of national curriculum levels is no longer used by the Government to report end of key stage assessment. The current ‘expected progress’ measure…will be replaced by a value-added measure. There will be no ‘target’ for the amount of progress an individual pupil is expected to make. Any amount of progress a pupil makes will contribute towards the school’s progress score.’

This means that schools will have three published progress scores: average progress in English reading, average progress in English writing and average progress in mathematics. Pupil level progress scores will appear in RAISEonline in the autumn term.

For a detailed look at how these progress scores will be calculated, read Stephen Anwyll’s blog post.

2016 Floor Standards

In 2016, the floor standard (the minimum standard for pupil attainment/progress that the DfE expects schools to meet) is:

At least 65% of pupils meeting the expected standard in English reading, English writing and mathematics.

or

The school achieves sufficient progress scores in all of English reading and English writing and mathematics.

The DfE say:

‘The attainment element is a combined measure. This means an individual pupil needs to meet the ‘expected standard’ in English reading, English writing and mathematics, in order to be counted towards the attainment element. To meet the progress element a school needs to have sufficient progress scores in English reading, and English writing, and mathematics. There is no measure of ‘sufficient progress’ for individual pupils.’

To be above the floor, the school needs to meet either the attainment or all of the progress element. Primary School Accountability in 2016 illustrates this with examples of schools that would be above and below the floor standard.

The document also outlines how point scores will be allocated to pupils and gives technical details of the confidence intervals that will be taken into account when determining whether a school is below the floor standard.

For more information about the practical steps schools can take to prepare for the changing accountability context, read Stephen Anwyll’s blog post Practical Steps for Accountability.

James Clements is a member of the Advisory Board for Oxford Owl, Oxford Primary’s online school improvement service. He has worked as a teacher and senior leader in an outstanding inner city primary school, as a Local Authority Lead Teacher, and was consulted on the New National Curriculum for English. James is now an English adviser and the creative director of Shakespeare and More, a not-for-profit organisation that promotes effective English teaching.
Follow James on Twitter @James_ShMore

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