Revision – what works?

A paper called ‘Improving Students’ Learning With Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions From Cognitive and Educational Psychology’ (Dunlosky et al, 2013) considers, in some detail, 10 learning techniques that cognitive and educational psychologists reckon could help students achieve their learning goals. Rather than spend valuable revision time reading the whole paper (though it is a fascinating paper to read), the Psychology Blog is happy to summarise some key findings […]

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Revision tips: mind maps

Lots of us use visual mapping techniques (like mind maps) to help us deal with planning work and remembering things: they are great for condensing what you know about a topic into a diagram that is easier to remember. Sketching out a quick mind map can also help jog your memory, too, making them a […]

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The formation of love in infant monkeys

This short (4 min) video shows aspects of the Harlows’ experiments with baby rhesus monkeys, who preferred to spend time with their contact-comforting cloth-covered mother rather than the wire mother who provided them with food. This video does a good job in highlighting some of the ethical concerns we would now have with this kind […]

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NICE guidance on CBT and schizophrenia

NICE, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, has issued new guidance on treatment for schizophrenia. It says that people who are exhibiting early symptoms of psychosis and schizophrenia should be offered CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) rather than antipsychotic drugs. There is quite a wide range of behaviours that can indicate the ‘prodromal stage’ which comes […]

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AQA’s exam change essentials

AQA has added a new section to its website all about specification change at GCSE and A Level. There’s nothing new about changes to Psychology yet, but there’s the option to sign up for email updates which might prove useful, and a selection of general resources and FAQs. This short video on how an AQA specification is […]

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Biased about bias

Psychologists take care to avoid bias in their investigations, for example making assumptions about differences between males and females (alpha bias) or overlooking differences between males and females (beta bias). A study by researchers at Princeton University suggests the existence of a ‘bias blind spot’ that means people recognise that bias exists but assume they personally […]

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